An Introduction to Mimetic Theory

SCROLL DOWN FOR RECENT POSTS AND VIDEOS

WATCH ALSO: GIRARD ON THE ORIGIN OF RELIGION (CLICK HERE)

CLICK HERE FOR FAQs (FROM RAVEN FOUNDATION)

KLIK HIER VOOR VERTALING VAN FAQs OVER MT

I compiled the following documentary film on the origin of cultures, in three parts, introducing some major topics of mimetic theory and René Girard’s thinking. Transcription of the videos (in English & Dutch) is available below, beneath PART III.

PART I of the film explores the fundamental role of mimesis (imitation) in human development on several levels (biological, psychological, sociological, cultural). René Girard’s originality lies in his  introduction of a connection between this old philosophical concept and human desire. He speaks of a certain mimetic desire and ascribes to it a vital role in our social interaction. It explains our often competitive and envious tendencies. More specifically, Girard considers mimetic desire as the source for a type of conflict that is foundational to the way human culture originates and develops. In his view the primal cultural institutions are religious. Following a sociologist like Émile Durkheim, Girard first considers religion as a means to organize our social fabric, and to manage violence within communities.

The more specific question the first part of this documentary tries to answer is the following: where do sacrifices, as rituals belonging to the first signs of human culture, originally come from? How can they be explained? Click to watch:

PART II starts off with a summary and then further insists on the fundamental role of the so-called scapegoat mechanism in the origin of religious and cultural phenomena.

PART III explores the world of mythology and human storytelling in the light of Girard’s theory on certain types of culture founding conflicts and scapegoat mechanisms. Girard comes to surprising conclusions regarding storytelling in Judeo-Christian Scripture. 

CLICK HERE FOR FULL VIDEO TRANSCRIPTION (PDF)

KLIK HIER VOOR EEN VERTALING (PDF)

KLIK HIER VOOR EEN OVERZICHT (PDF)

CURSUSMATERIAAL AFGELEID VAN VROUWEN, JEZUS EN ROCK-‘N-ROLL

COURSE MATERIAL BASED ON VROUWEN, JEZUS EN ROCK ‘N’ ROLL

 

Fun@School (SJC Aalst, Collegecross, 2017)

Muslim WomenOnce upon a time, there was this Muslim woman who wore a headscarf and always went on a rant when she saw other Muslim women without headscarves. She thought Muslim women without the scarf were “bad Muslims”. After her husband died, however, she herself decided not to wear the scarf any longer and let her hair hang down. As it turned out, she had been afraid of her husband, her family and the village she used to live in, and that was the real reason why she had worn the scarf. She thought that she would have lost face when she didn’t dress like the other women in her village. All along, she had desired to walk around like Muslim women without a headscarf, but because she hadn’t been able to fulfill this desire, she had convinced herself that she didn’t want to walk around without a headscarf, and she had begun to despise women who didn’t wear a scarf. That’s how she had comforted herself, how she had reconciled herself with her situation. In other words, this woman had been driven by ressentiment: she had developed an aversion towards something she had secretly desired.

Muslim WomanA couple of years ago, I had the privilege of welcoming some Muslim girls in my religion class. Among them were two sisters from Chechnya. Years later I came across them again in the streets of my hometown. One was wearing a headscarf, the other was not. I asked the one without the scarf if she considered herself less religious than her sister. She assured me that this was not the case, and her sister, the one with the scarf, added that it was not really an issue. The latter also wasn’t at all disturbed that her sister didn’t wear a scarf. She was happy with wearing a headscarf, it was her freely chosen way of symbolizing her faith, but she could understand that her sister made other choices.

Makes you think… Apparently, to point the finger at someone sometimes has to do with a desire to uphold a certain reputation or image. If you do things because of love for what you are doing, you are less inclined to judge people who make other choices (within certain ethical limits, of course).

Collegecross SJC Aalst 2016Yesterday our high school (Sint-Jozefscollege, Aalst – Belgium) organized its yearly run. Since a couple of years, our senior year students try to make their run more playful and humorous, instead of competitive. They just want to have some fun together. What I notice, however, is that a few of them do feel tempted to act like a nuisance to other students (or, in the past, to teachers and principals as well). They can’t seem to accept that not every student has the same idea of fun and humor. To those (few) students who point fingers at supposedly “uncool” and “lacking sense of humor” classmates, I would ask: if you are enjoying yourselves and if you are having fun (because of love for… the fun!), why would you care about others and their idea of fun? The thing is, if “having fun” and “being humorous” become serious business, not allowed to being put into perspective and to being criticized, then they gradually lose the fun and the humor. Especially when they become moral instruments for judging others.

This all happens when “having fun” is not primarily a sign that people are enjoying themselves, but is a way of establishing a “cool” reputation or image. Some students seem to imagine that they are performing some “heroic act against an all too disciplined school system” (which is not the case; our school is very tolerating – but maybe some of our students are a bit spoiled?). Their all too necessary “humor” becomes an outlet for frustrations. Although they reproach others with being humorless, they themselves seem filled with bitterness, unable to minimize the importance of their “fun”. Fun at the expense of others is no fun at all. It is often a sign of ressentiment.

In short, like a Muslim woman who wears a headscarf because she wants to uphold a certain reputation, some students “have fun” because they want to be noticed as “cool dudes”. It’s basic narcissism. And like the Muslim woman who wears a headscarf because of her image has the tendency to point fingers at others (she blames Muslim women without a headscarf for “not being true Muslims”), some students who “have fun” because of their image also have the tendency to point fingers at others (they blame the student who doesn’t take part in their particular activity for “not being humorous”).

Charlie Chaplin Quote on Laugh

On the other hand, a Muslim woman who freely wears a headscarf, because of love, will not have the tendency to point fingers at others. She will not bother or harm others. After all, she loves how she dresses. Equally, students who freely enjoy themselves, because of love, will not have the tendency to point fingers at others. They will not bother or harm others. After all, they love what they are doing…

Science or the Resurrection to Beauty

  • THE SPIRITUALITY OF A SCIENTIFIC ATTITUDE

Spirituality or a spiritual attitude basically consists of an interest in reality because of reality itself. It means that you do not reduce reality to a particular need or something that is useful (and, of course, what human beings need is not only defined by nature; we also mimetically learned to desire things beyond merely biological needs – nurture has its way as well in human life). It also means that the question of something’s or someone’s worth is not dependent on the question of usefulness. For instance, in a spiritual sense it makes no sense to ask about a newborn baby what he or she can be used for.

Nowadays we often seem brainwashed to approach reality from a utilitarian or even purely economic point of view. But this means that other aspects of reality and a more complete understanding of it remain in the dark. Therefore, St. John of the Cross writes:

St John of the Cross quote on spiritual understandingIf you purify your soul of attachment to and desire for things, you will understand them spiritually. If you deny your appetite for them, you will enjoy their truth, understanding what is certain in them.

Indeed, if a student no longer approaches a poem merely because of a possible test about it and because of a desire to get good grades, the student can become interested in the poem because of the poem itself – and enjoy its beauty. Indeed, if a physicist does not approach nature from the question how it can be made of use for the survival of the human species (what physicists rarely do, anyway), the physicist may approach the truth of nature more fully – and enjoy its poetry.

carrot and stick methodTruth, in whatever sense, does not primarily have to be useful. Truth has to be true. Nowadays, all too often in science too, research is legitimized by utilitarian concerns. But this is not what drives scientists who are involved in a quest for truth. The following clip may illustrate this. It is about assistant Professor Chao-Lin Kuo who surprises Professor Andrei Linde with evidence that supports cosmic inflation theory. The discovery, made by Kuo and his colleagues at the BICEP2 experiment, represents the first images of gravitational waves, or ripples in space-time. These waves have been described as the “first tremors of the Big Bang.” Note that possible recognition by organizations like the Nobel Prize Committee is a consequence of what these scientists do, it is not a goal that serves as the source of their passion and vocation as “truth seekers” (they are not enslaved donkeys who need that kind of carrot to move). Click to watch:

 

  • SPIRITUALITY IN AMERICAN BEAUTY (SAM MENDES, 1999)

The core of the spiritual attitude is portrayed magnificently in American Beauty (the 1999 Sam Mendes picture that would eventually win 5 Academy Awards out of 8 nominations). Lester Burnham, the main character (played by Academy Award winning actor Kevin Spacey), “passes from death to life” as he awakens to a fuller awareness of reality. In the beginning of the film Lester is entangled in the preoccupations of a society that focuses on appearances. Clearly he has gradually learned to approach other people and things from the question whether or not they are useful in his pursuit of happiness. Instead of giving him a fulfilled life, this utilitarian approach has left him empty and alienated from himself and others. “In a way, I am dead already,” he says.

Playboy Bunny Carrot CartoonThroughout the film, Lester becomes obsessed with the young “American Beauty” Angela, a friend of his daughter Jane. He mainly fantasizes about her as the ultimate fulfillment of his sexual desires. Angela knows about this male gaze all too well, and she presents herself accordingly in order to gain some sort of (questionable) recognition. Maybe she could have become a playboy bunny in the mansion of the late Hugh Hefner (1926-2017), who knows?

Angela appears to be a sexually very experienced girl. The reality, however, is that she is still a virgin. Lester awakens to this reality when he is on the verge of having sex with her. “This is my first time,” she tells him. This statement literally brings Lester to his senses. After that, he no longer approaches Angela from his particular needs, but he opens up to the more complete reality of the vulnerable angel that she is. In short, Lester becomes interested in Angela because of Angela herself, and not because of the satisfaction of his desires. For the first time he really looks at her more closely. He learns to love the truth and beauty of who she is, and is no longer blinded by who she appears to be. He converts to Love.

Lester has rediscovered a truly spiritual perspective on life, a perspective that is exemplified throughout the film by the character of Ricky, the son of the family next door. Ricky is able to contemplate reality because of reality itself and discovers beauty in all things. He is even moved by a bag, dancing in the wind. As he watches the film he made of it together with Jane, he says:

Do you want to see the most beautiful thing I’ve ever filmed? It was one of those days when it’s a minute away from snowing. And there’s this electricity in the air. You can almost hear it, right? And this bag was just… dancing with me… like a little kid begging me to play with it. For fifteen minutes. That’s the day I realized that there was this entire life behind things, and this incredibly benevolent force that wanted me to know that there was no reason to be afraid… ever. Video is a poor excuse, I know. But it helps me remember… I need to remember… Sometimes there’s so much beauty in the world I feel like I can’t take it, and my heart is just going to cave in.

Click to watch this scene:

These words of Ricky are repeated at the end of the film by Lester, whose voice over is actually the voice over of a dead man, a murdered man. By quoting the words of Ricky, Lester shows that he has truly become alive to reality as a whole. The paradox, of course, is that in the beginning of the film Lester is physically alive but dead spiritually (remember him saying, “In a way, I am dead already.”). At the end of the film he is dead physically but resurrected to a spiritually fulfilled life.

Biblically speaking, Lester went from being like Cain to being like Abel (see Genesis 4). Apparently, Cain’s goal in life is the recognition of others. He desires the affirmation of a certain idea of himself, and thus does not love himself nor others (he is not interested in others because of themselves, but because of his desire for recognition). Abel, on the other hand, approaches others because of a love for those others themselves. He presents a gift to make someone happy, not to gain some sort of status or prestige. Of course, the possible consequence of love is recognition. Cain, in contrast, presents a gift to get attention. That’s why he becomes jealous of his brother Abel when he sees that Abel’s gift is noticed and his is not. If Cain’s goal would have been to love the other, he would have been happy to see the other happy, even if it wasn’t with his gift. Cain’s deeds, however, clearly are not inspired by love. That’s why he becomes mad and that’s why he is unable to feel gratitude for the attention he does receive when the other he presented his gift to asks him, “Why are you so mad?” Dead to himself, Cain is dead to others as well. Eventually, Abel is also physically murdered by him. Indeed, if you’re associated with others who become obstacles to a desirable social image, you run the risk of being banned, eliminated or killed. Concerned with socially acceptable images, people tend to be in a constant state of transiency (“eternal life does not reside” in their identity, as they constantly have to change it to what’s popular), which, like Cain, leads them to hate themselves and others. In the New Testament, the first letter of John summarizes all of these insights (1 John 3: 11-15):

This is the message you heard from the beginning: We should love one another. Do not be like Cain, who belonged to the evil one and murdered his brother. And why did he murder him? Because his own actions were evil and his brother’s were righteous. Do not be surprised, my brothers and sisters, if the world hates you. We know that we have passed from death to life, because we love each other. Anyone who does not love remains in death. Anyone who hates a brother or sister is a murderer, and you know that no murderer has eternal life residing in him.

In American Beauty, Lester becomes one of those victims of people who want to protect their self-image. However, instead of mimetically responding to the lack of love and the evil that he had to endure by seeking revenge, he focuses on the love he did receive. That’s why he does not stay mad. That’s why he is eventually fulfilled with gratitude. Filled with grace, he becomes merciful – a forgiving victim (see James Alison’s theology). These are his final words:

I guess I could be pretty pissed off about what happened to me… but it’s hard to stay mad, when there’s so much beauty in the world. Sometimes I feel like I’m seeing it all at once, and it’s too much, my heart fills up like a balloon that’s about to burst… And then I remember to relax, and stop trying to hold on to it, and then it flows through me like rain and I can’t feel anything but gratitude for every single moment of my stupid little life… You have no idea what I’m talking about, I’m sure. But don’t worry… You will someday.

Click to watch more scenes and their analysis:

 

CLICK HERE TO SEE SCAPEGOATING IN AMERICAN BEAUTY

Vlaamse helden en zwarte zeurpieten?

  • HET VERHAAL VAN SOFIE

Sofie was nog net geen vijftien jaar toen ze op een vrijdagavond het huis uit sloop om naar een fuif van haar jeugdbeweging te fietsen in de parochiezaal van haar dorp. Ze had geen toelating gekregen van haar ouders, maar ze was vastbesloten om eens iets “rebels” te doen. In wat volgt, beschrijft Sofie hoe haar avond eindigde.

Vrij naar een fragment uit Brief aan Cooper en de wereld van Dalilla Hermans, Manteau, 2017:

“Ik probeerde me te amuseren, maar was de hele avond toch ook zenuwachtig. Ik had nog nooit zoiets rebels gedaan. En ik voelde me al snel schuldig. Lang voor de anderen besliste ik dan ook gewoon naar huis terug te gaan. Ik had uiteindelijk mijn punt wel bewezen. Ik was op een fuif geweest, en ik had iets stiekem gedaan. Ik was de ultieme puber.

Het was intussen nacht. In het donker zocht ik naar mijn fiets in de bosjes naast de kerk. Ik zocht mijn fietssleutel in het kleine tasje waarin ik de paarse lippenstift en mijn geld had gestopt. Hoe klein een tasje ook is, je verliest er altijd je sleutel in, vraag maar aan elke vrouw. Opeens hoorde ik gelach, vlakbij. Het klonk anders dan het geroezemoes dat door de lucht waaide van de parking van de parochiezaal. Het klonk gemaakt, vals.

‘Da’s Sofie’, hoorde ik een jongensstem zeggen. Mijn adem stokte. Ik draaide me om. In het donker zag ik een paar figuren op me afkomen. Ik voelde meteen dat het niet goed was, dat ik in gevaar was. Ik durfde me niet meer te bewegen, stond aan de grond genageld, mijn hand nog in het tasje. De jongens kwamen in een halve cirkel om me heen staan. Ik herkende een van hen vaag, waarschijnlijk degene die mijn naam had genoemd. De andere jongens had ik nog nooit gezien.

Het was te donker om een goed zicht te krijgen op wie er voor me stonden. Toen er een auto voorbijreed, zag ik even snel hun gezichten. De grootste, de oudste ook waarschijnlijk, stond in het midden voor me, bedreigend dichtbij. Hij had donkere ogen, ijzige ogen, die oplichtten door de koplampen van de auto. Zijn haar was donkerbruin, kortgeknipt, licht krullend. De andere jongens zagen er net zo uit. Ze droegen nauw aansluitende jeans, sportschoenen en leren jekkers. Ze spraken met hetzelfde, lichte accent. Plots herkende ik ze. Het was het groepje Marokkaanse moslimjongens dat ik altijd passeerde op weg naar het station. Ze hadden mij al eerder verbaal lastiggevallen. Ik hoorde het hen weer zeggen: ‘Met Mohammed heb je de beste seks, Vlaamse slet.’ Dat alles besefte ik in de paar seconden dat ik daar zo stond.

Het leken een paar uren. De grootste zei iets tegen me, spottend, en spuwde op de grond. Ik had het niet verstaan. Ik durfde nog steeds niet me te bewegen, hield mijn adem in. Ik keek hem aan met grote, bange ogen. Met mijn blik pleitte ik om met rust te worden gelaten. Zonder woorden gilde ik dat ik gewoon naar huis wilde. Met mijn opengesperde ogen smekend dat ze weg wilden gaan. Zwijgend. Dat leken ze grappig te vinden, dat ik niets durfde te zeggen.

Ze porden elkaar, lachten. Ik rook hun adem, zo dichtbij stonden ze. Nog altijd verstond ik niet wat ze zeiden. Ik zat gevangen in een verstard lichaam, stijf van angst en in paniek. Wat waren ze van plan? Niemand kon me hier horen, niemand kon me zien. Niemand wist waar ik was. Opeens was er een woord waardoor ik weer bij mijn positieven kwam. Iemand zei ‘zeiken’. Het duurde een tel voordat mijn brein dat verwerkt had. ‘Ik moet eigenlijk ook zeiken’, klonk uit de mond van een ander.

Ze zouden toch niet… Dat kon niet. Zoiets gebeurt niet, niet in het echt, niet met mij. Nog voordat ik die gedachte kon afmaken, voelde ik iets warms en nats tegen mijn been klateren. Ik voelde mijn broek, die ik nog maar pas had gekregen, voor in de winter wanneer we geen uniformrok moesten dragen, nat en zwaar worden. Ik zag rook omhoog kringelen, van de warme urine die dampte in de koude nachtlucht.

Ik dacht dat ik flauw zou vallen. Of zou overgeven. Ik wilde schreeuwen. Ik wilde… Maar ik deed niks. Ik stond daar, gevangen in een verstard lichaam, terwijl de jongens op me plasten. Ik sloot mijn ogen. Ik weet niet hoelang ik daar zo heb gestaan. Ik weet niet hoelang de hele episode heeft geduurd.

Toen ik mijn ogen opende, waren ze aan het weglopen. Ze lachten. Luid, vals, triomfantelijk. Op de automatische piloot vond ik mijn fietssleutel en fietste naar huis. Ik huilde niet. Thuisgekomen stroopte ik de natte broek van mijn lijf. Ik rolde het ding tot een bal en wierp het in een hoek van de garage. Ik ging gewoon slapen.

Ik vertelde aan niemand wat er gebeurd was. Als ik deed alsof het niet gebeurd was, zou het ook zo zijn. Misschien was het ook niet echt. Er waren geen getuigen. De volgende dag stopte ik de natte broek in een plastic zak, fietste ermee naar het speelpleintje in onze wijk en propte de zak daar in een vuilnisbak. Zo, het was niet gebeurd. Er waren geen getuigen, en er was geen bewijs. Telkens als mama die winter vroeg waarom ik mijn nieuwe broek niet aandeed, reageerde ik geïrriteerd, zoals een echt pubermeisje, dat olifantenpijpen alweer uit de mode waren.”

Deze ervaring heeft Sofie getekend. Begrijpelijk. Ze wil vermijden dat nog andere meisjes het slachtoffer worden van zoveel seksistisch geweld en racisme. Jaren later, ze is intussen zelf moeder geworden, krijgt ze op een dag een flyer in de bus voor een debat over het al dan niet toelaten van hoofddoeken op de school van haar dochter. Moslimmeisjes hadden daar om gevraagd.

Sofie schrijft een boze brief aan het schoolbestuur. “Dit kan niet!” schrijft ze. “Die meisjes hebben zelf niet door in wat voor een seksistische cultuur ze opgevoed worden; die hoofddoek is per definitie een symbool van de onderdrukking van de vrouw! Wie met jeugd werkt, kan zoiets niet promoten! De islam is in het algemeen trouwens een gevaarlijke, onderdrukkende godsdienst die onze vrijheden bedreigt. Vrouwen mogen niet gekleed gaan zoals ze willen, en redacties van satirische tijdschriften worden bedreigd als ze Mohammed-cartoons afbeelden. Terroristen als de mannen die de aanslagen pleegden op de redactie van het satirische tijdschrift Charlie Hebdo moeten niet nog meer ruimte krijgen in onze samenleving.” De brief van Sofie wordt opgepikt door enkele kranten, en binnen de kortste keren verschijnt ze in verschillende programma’s op televisie.

Gelukkig kan ze bij veel mensen op begrip rekenen. Een groot deel van de moslimgemeenschap keert zich echter tegen haar. “Wij zijn helemaal geen onderdrukte vrouwen”, beweert een van de moslimmeisjes die om het debat had gevraagd. “Ik draag graag een hoofddoek, mijn zus niet. Wij maken zelf die keuze, en waarom zouden we die keuzevrijheid niet krijgen? Godsdienstvrijheid is een mensenrecht. Sofie suggereert daarbovenop nog eens dat we de weg zouden plaveien voor terroristen, terwijl de manier waarop wij onze godsdienst beleven volstrekt niets te maken heeft met de gruwelijke daden van die mensen.” Ze besluit: “Wij zijn helemaal geen terroristen.”

Een andere moslima kruipt in haar pen en schrijft aan Sofie een open brief, die alweer verschijnt in verscheidene kranten. “Je wentelt je in een slachtofferrol en vraagt op die manier om aandacht. Je zou zelfs kunnen denken dat je een aandachtshoer bent. Gelukkig reageert niet iedereen zo hysterisch als jij op een hoofddoek. Jij associeert hoofddoeken met onderdrukking van vrouwen en (groeiend gevaar voor) terroristische aanslagen, terwijl de overgrote meerderheid van de moslimgemeenschap daar absoluut niets mee te maken wil hebben. Misschien moet je ook eens overwegen dat moslimvrouwen soms een ander idee hebben dan jij over wat vrouwenemancipatie eigenlijk is. Dat mag volgens de vrijheid van meningsuiting. Je moet geen lange tenen hebben. We hebben allemaal onze jeugdtrauma’s. Get over it. Ik werd vroeger bespot om mijn kleine gestalte. Moest ik dan een boze brief schrijven in naam van de VKM (Vereniging van Kleine Moslims)? Ach, buit je slachtofferschap zo niet uit om in de schijnwerpers te staan en reddertje te spelen. Kortom, je moet niet zo klagen.”

En zo wordt er plotseling langs alle kanten geklaagd over iemand die zich zorgen maakt en haar beklag doet over mogelijke uitingen van religieus extremisme. Sofie wordt afgeschilderd als een paranoïde aandachtshoer, een narcistisch iemand die spoken ziet. Ze is bovendien laf. Ze lijkt niet in staat om volledig los te komen van haar jeugdtrauma, terwijl de kleine moslima haar het zogezegd heldhaftige goede voorbeeld geeft: zij kan wel afstand nemen van de mensen die haar uitlachten om haar gestalte.

Vanuit haar trauma overdrijft Sofie misschien, dat is waar. Maar het is op zijn minst te betwijfelen of ze echt handelt uit narcisme. Ze heeft alvast aan den lijve ervaren hoezeer religieus of ander seksisme kan kwetsen, en het lijkt erop dat ze anderen zulke kwetsuren wil besparen. Meisjes van veertien moeten niet beplast worden door een groepje jongens “om karakter te kweken”. Vooraleer we zelf op onze tenen getrapt zijn en ons beklag doen over de zogezegd “lange tenen” van Sofie, loont het de moeite om in gesprek te gaan met iemand die handelt uit zelfrespect en liefde. Onze eigen zogenaamde heldhaftigheid omtrent slachtofferschap onder de aandacht brengen om dat gesprek te beginnen, is een narcistische reflex die ieder mogelijk begrip voor de positie van de ander afsluit. We zijn tot meer in staat.

  • HET VERHAAL VAN DALILLA

Dalilla was nog net geen vijftien jaar toen ze op een vrijdagavond het huis uit sloop om naar een fuif van haar jeugdbeweging te fietsen in de parochiezaal van haar dorp. Ze had geen toelating gekregen van haar ouders, maar ze was vastbesloten om eens iets “rebels” te doen. In wat volgt, beschrijft Dalilla hoe haar avond eindigde.

Fragment uit Brief aan Cooper en de wereld van Dalilla Hermans, Manteau, 2017:

“Ik probeerde me te amuseren, maar was de hele avond toch ook zenuwachtig. Ik had nog nooit zoiets rebels gedaan. En ik voelde me al snel schuldig. Lang voor de anderen besliste ik dan ook gewoon naar huis terug te gaan. Ik had uiteindelijk mijn punt wel bewezen. Ik was op een fuif geweest, en ik had iets stiekem gedaan. Ik was de ultieme puber.

Het was intussen nacht. In het donker zocht ik naar mijn fiets in de bosjes naast de kerk. Ik zocht mijn fietssleutel in het kleine tasje waarin ik de paarse lippenstift en mijn geld had gestopt. Hoe klein een tasje ook is, je verliest er altijd je sleutel in, vraag maar aan elke vrouw. Opeens hoorde ik gelach, vlakbij. Het klonk anders dan het geroezemoes dat door de lucht waaide van de parking van de parochiezaal. Het klonk gemaakt, vals.

‘Da’s Dalilla’, hoorde ik een jongensstem zeggen. Mijn adem stokte. Ik draaide me om. In het donker zag ik een paar figuren op me afkomen. Ik voelde meteen dat het niet goed was, dat ik in gevaar was. Ik durfde me niet meer te bewegen, stond aan de grond genageld, mijn hand nog in het tasje. De jongens kwamen in een halve cirkel om me heen staan. Ik herkende een van hen vaag, waarschijnlijk degene die mijn naam had genoemd. De andere jongens had ik nog nooit gezien.

Het was te donker om een goed zicht te krijgen op wie er voor me stonden. Toen er een auto voorbijreed, zag ik even snel hun gezichten. De grootste, de oudste ook waarschijnlijk, stond in het midden voor me, bedreigend dichtbij. Hij had helblauwe ogen, ijzige ogen, die oplichtten door de koplampen van de auto. Hij droeg een pet, zo’n platte opapet. De andere jongens waren kaal. Ze droegen zwarte bottines en dikke bomberjacks. Het waren skinheads. Dat alles besefte ik in de paar seconden dat ik daar zo stond.

Het leken een paar uren. Hij zei iets tegen me, spottend, en spuwde op de grond. Ik had het niet verstaan. Ik durfde nog steeds niet me te bewegen, hield mijn adem in. Ik keek hem aan met grote, bange ogen. Met mijn blik pleitte ik om met rust te worden gelaten. Zonder woorden gilde ik dat ik gewoon naar huis wilde. Met mijn opengesperde ogen smekend dat ze weg wilden gaan. Zwijgend. Dat leken ze grappig te vinden, dat ik niets durfde te zeggen.

Ze porden elkaar, lachten. Ik rook hun bieradem, zo dichtbij stonden ze. Nog altijd verstond ik niet wat ze zeiden. Ik zat gevangen in een verstard lichaam, stijf van angst en in paniek. Wat waren ze van plan? Niemand kon me hier horen, niemand kon me zien. Niemand wist waar ik was. Opeens was er een woord waardoor ik weer bij mijn positieven kwam. Iemand zei ‘zeiken’. Het duurde een tel voordat mijn brein dat verwerkt had. ‘Ik moet eigenlijk ook zeiken’, klonk uit de mond van een ander.

Ze zouden toch niet… Dat kon niet. Zoiets gebeurt niet, niet in het echt, niet met mij. Nog voordat ik die gedachte kon afmaken, voelde ik iets warms en nats tegen mijn been klateren. Ik voelde mijn broek, die ik nog maar pas had gekregen, voor in de winter wanneer we geen uniformrok moesten dragen, nat en zwaar worden. Ik zag rook omhoog kringelen, van de warme urine die dampte in de koude nachtlucht.

Ik dacht dat ik flauw zou vallen. Of zou overgeven. Ik wilde schreeuwen zoals ik tegen mijn ouders had geschreeuwd. Ik wilde… Maar ik deed niks. Ik stond daar, gevangen in een verstard lichaam, terwijl de jongens op me plasten. Ik sloot mijn ogen. Ik weet niet hoelang ik daar zo heb gestaan. Ik weet niet hoelang de hele episode heeft geduurd.

Toen ik mijn ogen opende, waren ze aan het weglopen. Ze lachten. Luid, vals, triomfantelijk. Op de automatische piloot vond ik mijn fietssleutel en fietste naar huis. Ik huilde niet. Thuisgekomen stroopte ik de natte broek van mijn lijf. Ik rolde het ding tot een bal en wierp het in een hoek van de garage. Ik ging gewoon slapen.

Ik vertelde aan niemand wat er gebeurd was. Als ik deed alsof het niet gebeurd was, zou het ook zo zijn. Misschien was het ook niet echt. Er waren geen getuigen. De volgende dag stopte ik de natte broek in een plastic zak, fietste ermee naar het speelpleintje in onze wijk en propte de zak daar in een vuilnisbak. Zo, het was niet gebeurd. Er waren geen getuigen, en er was geen bewijs. Telkens als mama die winter vroeg waarom ik mijn nieuwe broek niet aandeed, reageerde ik geïrriteerd, zoals een echt pubermeisje, dat olifantenpijpen alweer uit de mode waren.”

Deze ervaring heeft Dalilla getekend. Begrijpelijk. Ze wil vermijden dat nog andere meisjes het slachtoffer worden van zoveel seksistisch geweld en racisme. Jaren later, ze is intussen zelf moeder geworden, ziet ze op een dag een poster voor de zogenaamde “oerwoudfuif” van een scoutsgroep. Op de poster staat een karikatuur van een zwart Afrikaans jongetje afgebeeld.

Dalilla reageert boos, en haar reactie verschijnt in de media. “Dit is een schoolvoorbeeld van hoe je zwarte kinderen en jongeren nogmaals in de hoek van ‘jolig n-woordje uit het oerwoud’ duwt”, beweert ze. Ze geeft meer uitleg:

“Beeldtaal is een heel krachtig wapen. Door constant bepaalde beelden te zien van zwarte mensen en zelden een tegengeluid installeer je bepaalde visies in mensen. Je geeft de onderliggende boodschap dat zwarte mensen zoals die stereotypen zijn (= grotesk uiterlijk, aapachtig, altijd vrolijk, dom, niet serieus etc.) en je praat historisch onrecht goed (=de koloniale periode, slavernij, institutioneel racisme). Daarom vecht ik tegen dat soort beeldtaal.”

Bij veel mensen kan Dalilla op begrip rekenen. Een groot deel van de blanke Vlaamse bevolking keert zich echter tegen haar. “Wij zijn helemaal geen racisten, beweert een zekere Jozef. “Het moet maar eens gedaan zijn met ons te linken aan (neo-)nazisme, slavenhandel en kolonisatie. Mijn voorouders zijn nooit met die zaken in contact gekomen en ze hebben er ook niet aan meegewerkt. Die vrouw is een aandachtshoer die overal spoken ziet.”

Journalist Luckas Vander Taelen kruipt in zijn pen en schrijft een open brief aan Dalilla. Hij schrijft onder andere:

“Als roodharige jongen werd ik vaak geconfronteerd met onaangename opmerkingen. Omdat ik sproeten in mijn gezicht had, vroeg een man me lachend of ik ‘in hondenpoep geblazen had’. Mijn moeder legde me uit hoe stom die man wel was en dat hij jaloers was omdat mijn haarkleur zoveel mooier was dan de zijne. […] Dit is misschien wel het misverstand, Dalilla: het gaat hier bij de oerwoudaffiche niet over een afbeelding van een zwarte Belg. Als de tekening was gebruikt als uitnodiging voor een debat over diversiteit, dan zou dat bepaald aanstootgevend geweest zijn, omdat een zwarte landgenoot gelijkgesteld wordt met een karikatuur van een inwoner van het oerwoud. Maar het ging dus over een brousse-themafuif. Ik zocht gisteren enige foto’s van mensen die daar wonen en kon er geen andere vinden dan een hele reeks die jij waarschijnlijk al even stigmatiserend en karikaturaal zou vinden. Want die mensen zien er heel erg verschillend van ons uit. En als die tot stripfiguurtjes worden getransformeerd, dan excelleert een karikaturist in de kunst van de overdrijving. Dat heb je nu eenmaal met karikaturisten. Ik heb daar nooit van gehouden. Ooit prijkte er een van mezelf op de cover van een Vlaams weekblad. Al mijn kenmerken waren op de spits gedreven; ik werd er niet vrolijk van. Maar ik heb me niet verontwaardigd uitgesproken in naam van alle roodharigen met flaporen. Moslims hebben het moeilijk met cartoons van Allah. Zij vinden dat die niet mogen. De redactie van Charlie Hebdo werd uitgemoord door mensen die dachten dat ze handelden in naam van het grote morele gelijk. Nu houdt zelfs Charlie zich in om nog zogenaamd aanstootgevende cartoons over de islam te publiceren. […] Soms is het belangrijk zijn verontwaardiging op te sparen en niet epidermisch te reageren op iets als een scoutsaffiche uit Hansbeke. Daarmee krijg je misschien veel applaus uit eigen rangen, maar oogst je vooral veel onbegrip…”

En zo wordt er plotseling langs alle kanten geklaagd over iemand die zich zorgen maakt en haar beklag doet over mogelijke uitingen van racisme. Dalilla wordt afgeschilderd als een paranoïde aandachtshoer, een narcistisch iemand die spoken ziet. Ze is bovendien laf. Ze lijkt niet in staat om volledig los te komen van haar jeugdtrauma, terwijl Luckas Vander Taelen haar het zogezegd heldhaftige goede voorbeeld geeft: hij kan wel afstand nemen van de mensen die hem uitlachten om zijn flaporen.

Vanuit haar trauma overdrijft Dalilla misschien, dat is waar. Maar het is op zijn minst te betwijfelen of ze echt handelt uit narcisme. Ze heeft alvast aan den lijve ervaren hoezeer racisme kan kwetsen, en het lijkt erop dat ze anderen zulke kwetsuren wil besparen. Meisjes van veertien moeten niet beplast worden door een groepje jongens “om karakter te kweken”. Vooraleer we zelf op onze tenen getrapt zijn en ons beklag doen over Dalilla’s zogezegd “lange tenen”, loont het de moeite om in gesprek te gaan met iemand die handelt uit zelfrespect en liefde. Onze eigen zogenaamde heldhaftigheid omtrent slachtofferschap onder de aandacht brengen om dat gesprek te beginnen, is een narcistische reflex die ieder mogelijk begrip voor de positie van de ander afsluit. Luckas Vander Taelen bombarderen tot “Vlaamse held” en Dalilla Hermans tot “zwarte zeurpiet” is al te gemakkelijk. We zijn tot meer in staat.

In termen van de Frans-Amerikaanse denker René Girard is er een vorm van mimetische rivaliteit tussen groepen die elk aandacht opeisen voor hun gevoeligheden; daarbij wil de ene niet “racistisch” genoemd worden (of verweten worden van “(neo)nazistische terreur”), en de andere niet “terroristisch” (of verweten worden van “(islamistisch) racisme”), terwijl we de andere partij vlotjes aanwrijven waarvan we zelf niet willen verdacht worden. Met andere woorden: de pot verwijt de ketel… Of nog, in Bijbelse termen: we zien gemakkelijk de splinter in het oog van iemand anders, terwijl we blind blijven voor de balk in ons eigen oog.

  • VIETATO LAMENTARSI, VERBODEN TE KLAGEN!

In naam van slachtoffers van terreur hele groepen stigmatiseren, discrimineren en tot slachtoffer maken, is pervers. Het is de terreur verder zetten door nieuwe slachtoffers te maken.

De N-VA-fractie protesteert terecht tegen een gefotoshopte afbeelding van Theo Francken in nazi-uniform, gepubliceerd door de jeugdafdeling van Ecolo. De slachtoffers van de holocaust moeten niet misbruikt worden om met een zogezegd “ludieke” of “studentikoze” actie aan politiek te doen. De N-VA-fractie verwijten dat ze “lange tenen” zou hebben, is dan ook totaal misplaatst. Of niet?

Sympathisanten van Dalilla Hermans geven terecht kritiek op uitlatingen waarin Dalilla al te snel vergeleken wordt met de terroristen die de aanslagen pleegden op de redactie van Charlie Hebdo. De slachtoffers van terreuraanslagen moeten niet misbruikt worden om een open en vrij gesprek over de rol van beeldvorming in de kiem te smoren. Dalilla verwijten dat ze “lange tenen” zou hebben, is dan ook totaal misplaatst, niet?

Dalilla Hermans heeft het recht om haar mening te geven en kritiek te leveren op een bepaald soort afbeelding van een Afrikaans jongetje. De NV-A-fractie heeft het recht om haar mening te geven en kritiek te leveren op een bepaald soort afbeelding van Theo Francken.

Alles kan natuurlijk ook humor zijn, maar humor die zichzelf bloedernstig neemt en geen kritiek verdraagt, is geen humor meer.

Humor kan bevrijdend zijn, als het machtsstructuren relativeert, als het mensen in een context van wederzijds vertrouwen in staat stelt om hun eigen identiteit te relativeren, als het mensen uiteindelijk samen laat lachen en dichter bij elkaar brengt. Maar humor kan ook louter bijtend en destructief zijn, als het vanuit frustraties gericht is op het kwetsen van anderen. Humor wordt dan een nietsontziende cynische pletwals en al te noodzakelijke uitlaatklep van een verwende en verzuurde samenleving, een vermomde uiting van verbittering, waarin gevoeligheden van anderen niet van tel zijn. In dat soort samenleving moet je niet verwonderd zijn dat sommige jonge leerlingen wel klagen over schoolse begrenzingen van promotiecampagnes voor 100dagen-fuiven, maar veel minder klagen over het feit dat enkele medeleerlingen gepest worden…

Vandaar:

Verboden te klagen (uit een narcistische reflex) om te kunnen (aan)klagen (uit liefde en zelfrespect)!

  • CHRISTIAN VIRTUES GONE MAD…

Wat vaak opvalt in hedendaagse debatten is de mimetische competitie om slachtofferschap: individuen en groepen imiteren elkaar in de presentatie van zichzelf als slachtoffer. Wie zichzelf als het grootste slachtoffer kan voorstellen, heeft zogezegd het meeste spreekrecht. Dat heeft te maken met de immense impact van Jezus van Nazareth op de geschiedenis – althans volgens Friedrich Nietzsche, die bekende atheïstische filosoof.

Misschien heeft Nietzsche wel gelijk. Stel je eens voor dat je een attest bovenhaalt van arbeidsongeschiktheid wegens ziekte of een ongeval, of dat je kan bewijzen last te hebben van ADHD, ADD, ASS, dyslexie of dyscalculie, van sociale, psychologische of financiële problemen, en dat je zou leven in een klassiek antieke cultuur die nog niet “besmet” is door de joodse of christelijke godsdienst. Als slachtoffer van om het even welke aandoening of rampspoed zou je dan te horen krijgen dat je het lot maar moet aanvaarden, of erger nog, dat je op een of andere manier verdiend hebt wat je te beurt valt (vanuit “karma” en zo van die dingen).

De joodse en christelijke geschriften introduceren gaandeweg een radicaal nieuwe visie op slachtoffers. Dat blijkt vooral uit het optreden van Jezus van Nazareth die, bijvoorbeeld in de Bergrede, slachtoffers niet langer beschouwt als “vervloekten” zonder recht van spreken, maar integendeel, als mensen die precies de (oproep tot) gerechtigheid aan hun kant hebben. Via denkers als Erasmus (“de vader van het humanisme”) is deze nieuwtestamentische visie op slachtoffers ook in de moderniteit levend gehouden, ook als de christelijke kerken hun eigen evangelie verloochenden. Daardoor geraakte uiteindelijk de hele westerse cultuur doordrongen van het idee dat slachtoffers “recht van spreken” hebben.

Volgens Nietzsche is dit een volstrekt negatieve evolutie geweest, ingegeven vanuit het ressentiment van zwakkelingen tegenover machtigen (voor een kritiek op deze opvatting van Nietzsche over de joods-christelijke traditie: klik hier). In zijn werk minacht hij voortdurend wat hij “de joods-christelijke slavenmoraal” noemt. Het is geen toeval dat het nazisme enkele essentiële concepten van Nietzsche gebruikte en in meerdere opzichten een “neo-paganistische” ideologie bleek. Niettemin, ondanks de nazistische poging in het midden van de twintigste eeuw om “alles wat joods was” uit te roeien, heeft de joods-christelijke godsdienst, om het in de woorden van Nietzsche te zeggen, “er tweeduizend jaar over gedaan om de overwinning te behalen.” En over Jezus schrijft Nietzsche (let wel, zoals de hoger vermelde link al aangeeft: Nietzsche vergist zich als hij beweert dat de positieve aandacht voor slachtoffers bij Jezus zou ingegeven zijn vanuit ressentiment):

“Die Jezus van Nazareth, het vleesgeworden evangelie der liefde, de ‘Verlosser’ die de armen, zieken en zondaren de zaligheid en overwinning brengt – was hij niet juist de verleiding in haar meest beklemmende en onweerstaanbare gedaante, de verleiding en omweg tot juist die Joodse waarden en vernieuwingen van het ideaal? Heeft Israël niet juist langs de omweg van deze ‘Verlosser’, deze schijnbare vijand en ontbindende kracht Israëls, het laatste doel van zijn sublieme wraakzucht bereikt?”

(Zie Friedrich Nietzsche, Zur Genealogie der Moral, eerste essay, par. 8.).

Vandaag zie je niet toevallig het volgende gebeuren (om bij de hoger vermelde voorbeelden te blijven):

  • Dalilla Hermans claimt spreekrecht in naam van slachtoffers van racisme.
  • Luckas Vander Taelen claimt spreekrecht in naam van slachtoffers van censuur en terroristische aanslagen.
  • Ecolo J claimt spreekrecht in naam van slachtoffers die op de vlucht zijn.
  • NV-A claimt spreekrecht in naam van slachtoffers van diabolisering (in casu Theo Francken).

De vraag is echter of in zulke debatten slachtoffers wel altijd werkelijk slachtoffers zijn. Soms zullen daders zichzelf voorstellen als slachtoffers, of zich associëren met slachtoffers, om een discriminerende politiek te rechtvaardigen – waarbij dan net slachtoffers worden gemaakt! IS-strijders, bijvoorbeeld, stellen zichzelf wat graag voor als slachtoffers van onderdrukking om hun terreurdaden in bepaalde landen te legitimeren (terwijl moslims in de betreffende landen misschien helemaal niet worden gediscrimineerd). In dat geval perverteert de joods-christelijke invloed tot haar tegendeel (en Nietzsche valt eigenlijk, zonder het zelf te beseffen, de pervertering van het christelijk verhaal aan): in plaats van slachtoffers te beschermen, worden in naam van de rechten van slachtoffers nieuwe slachtoffers gemaakt (vanuit ressentiment). G.K. Chesterton beweert niet toevallig “dat de moderne wereld vol is van oude christelijke deugden die doorgedraaid zijn” (zie zijn werk Orthodoxy – pdf).

Zie ook volgende citaten in dit verband.

René Girard in Evolution and Conversion – Dialogues on the Origins of Culture, Continuum, London, New York, 2007, p. 236:

“We have experienced various forms of totalitarianism that openly denied Christian principles. There has been the totalitarianism of the Left, which tried to outflank Christianity; and there has been totalitarianism of the Right, like Nazism, which found Christianity too soft on victims. This kind of totalitarianism is not only alive but it also has a great future. There will probably be some thinkers in the future who will reformulate this principle in a politically correct fashion, in more virulent forms, which will be more anti-Christian, albeit in an ultra-Christian caricature. When I say more Christian and more anti-Christian, I imply the figure of the Anti-Christ. The Anti-Christ is nothing but that: it is the ideology that attempts to outchristianize Christianity, that imitates Christianity in a spirit of rivalry.

[…]

You can foresee the shape of what the Anti-Christ is going to be in the future: a super-victimary machine that will keep on sacrificing in the name of the victim.”

Gil Bailie in Violence Unveiled – Humanity at the Crossroads, The Crossroad Publishing Company, New York, 1995, p. 20:

“There’s plenty of truth in the revised picture of Western history that the young are now routinely taught, the picture of the West’s swashbuckling appetite for power, wealth, and dominion. What’s to be noted is that it is we, and not our cultural adversaries, who are teaching it to them. It is we, the spiritual beneficiaries of that less than always edifying history, who automatically empathize more with our ancestors’ victims than with our ancestors themselves. If we are tempted to think that this amazing shift is the product of our own moral achievement, all we have to do is look around at how shamelessly we exploit it for a little power, wealth, and dominion of our own.

The fact is that the concern for victims has gradually become the principal gyroscope in the Western world. Even the most vicious campaigns of victimization – including, astonishingly, even Hitler’s – have found it necessary to base their assertion of moral legitimacy on the claim that their goal was the protection or vindication of victims. However savagely we behave, and however wickedly and selectively we wield this moral gavel, protecting or rescuing innocent victims has become the cultural imperative everywhere the biblical influence has been felt.”

Sherin Khankan on Islam

Sherin Khankan (°1974), Denmark’s first female imam and one of the leaders of the Mariam Mosque in Copenhagen, was interviewed for Belgian television (May 29th, 2017).

The full interview can be watched here – definitely a MUST SEE:

Here are some transcripted excerpts from the interview:

Interviewer Bart Schols: Did you get some bad reactions on what you’re doing? Because every religion has a very traditional side sometimes, probably also in Denmark?

Sherin Khankan: Actually, I never focus on the bad reactions. I always focus on the support, and we have a lot of support from all over the world. Actually, recently we had a visitor, from one of the world’s largest mosques, the world’s third largest mosque – it’s the Grand Mosque in Indonesia –, and the grand imam he came and he blessed our mosque, and he prayed in our mosque, and he made a written document, saying that female imams are of course a possibility, and it’s a part of our Islamic tradition and theology… So, but of course, when you create change… When you change the structure, when you change the fundamentals, when you challenge the patriarchal structure, you challenge the power balance. And when you do that, people will get upset, it’s natural.

So we are prepared for opposition, but actually the worst opposition that we met so far was not from Muslims. The reactions from Muslims were quite moderate, but from the right wing parties, Islamophobes, Nazi-parties… we had very bad reactions.

Interviewer: More than from the inside?

Sherin Khankan: Yeah, I think it’s because… to Islamophobes progressive Muslims are a greater threat than Islamists are, because we are actually able to change the narrative on Islam in Europe.

Interviewer: Okay. You are traveling around the world with a message, if I may call it like that. What is the fight that you are fighting?

Sherin Khankan: First of all we want to give women the chance to disseminate the Islamic message. We want to create a place where women are equal to men. We want to challenge the patriarchal structure. We want to challenge the growing Islamophobia, and we wish to unite or unify all the great forces throughout the world who are fighting for women’s rights.

Interviewer: That’s in general, but if you, like in different countries, because you travel around the world, around Europe… you have different issues. There’s the headscarf, that’s a discussion about everywhere, also here in Belgium. What is your position on that?

Sherin Khankan: I do believe that, it’s stated very clearly in the Declaration of Human Rights, that any person has the right to practice his or her religion in the public sphere and in the private sphere. So if a person chooses to wear the headscarf of her own free will, it’s her choice and nobody should be able to touch that woman.

Interviewer: Also a police officer, for example?

Sherin Khankan: Of course, why not? A police officer, a doctor, a lawyer, a judge, anyone, because what’s important is not what you wear on your head. It’s what you have inside your head. So even if you ban the scarf, people will still have the same opinions inside. So it’s not a matter of the scarf, it’s a matter of realizing that we are living in a world and we have to accept pluralism as a factor, as a fundament for our societies. If not we are becoming oppressive. So I’m fighting for any woman’s right to wear the hijab and not to wear the hijab…

From a rational point of view, you would expect that Western extreme right-wing parties are delighted with the kind of Islam Sherin Khankan is advocating. After all, their message to people from other cultures has always been: “Adapt or go back to your country!” Exactly what culture people should adapt to or how that culture is defined is never quite clear, but anyways: here you have a kind of Islam that is perfectly compatible with the principles of a Western political, secularized culture, respecting the separation of Church and State. This separation goes both ways, of course. Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights makes it very clear:

Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance.

Sherin Khankan defends an Islam that does not interfere with the fundamental rights in a modern, Western democracy, so what are some extreme right-wing parties making such a fuss about? Aren’t they defending their “own” Western culture and values? Apparently, we shouldn’t expect too much rationality from them. What happens is quite simple: extreme right-wing parties partly need an “enemy monster” to justify and manage their own existence. If the so-called monster that is Islam turns out not to be such a monster after all, their reason for existence is threatened. That’s why extreme right-wing parties always make reasonable Muslim voices “the exception”. Sometimes they also argue that those reasonable Muslim voices are to blame for the infiltration of Islamist extremists in Western society, as if they function as “hosts” for extremist “parasites”.

What extreme right-wing parties rarely notice, of course, is the result of research done by security services all over the world: when people feel very oppressed or frustrated, they can radicalize very quickly one way or the other (extreme right-wing parties, as advocates of the reasoning that “our own culture is under threat”, are also an example). So to suppress a religion like Islam and Muslims is a very bad idea. The British Security Service MI5 (Military Intelligence, Section 5) claims there is evidence that a well-established religious identity actually protects against violent radicalization. Indeed, as the research by MI5 reveals, the vast majority of extremists participating in terrorist attacks in the UK, are British nationals. They are not illegal immigrants and, far from having received a religious upbringing, most are religious novices.

Ah, well… Are we strong enough to create identities beyond the need for an enemy monster? What if “the Wicked Witch of the West” isn’t wicked after all? I can’t help but mention in this context a great book that deals with the recurring dynamic of the need for a monstrous enemy: The Wicked Truth: When Good People Do Bad Things by Suzanne Ross. It is about the musical Wicked, the subversive and challenging prequel to the well-known story of The Wizard of Oz. Indeed, today we could ask the question: “What if the Wicked Witch of Islam isn’t wicked after all?” Maybe we remain anti-rational weaklings who need witches… Or maybe there’s hope, if we just listen to women like Sherin Khankan.

 

The Power of Myth (Joseph Campbell vs René Girard)

 

Joseph Campbell, a well-known scholar in the field of comparative mythology, became quite famous when his works inspired film director George Lucas to create the Star Wars saga (click here for more on this). Shortly before his death in 1987, Campbell was interviewed by Bill Moyers at Skywalker Ranch (home of Lucas, indeed). These conversations served as the basis for a six part PBS documentary series, Joseph Campbell and the Power of Myth. The series was originally broadcast on television in 1988. It remains one of the most popular documentary series in the history of American public television.

This article will summarize Campbell’s main ideas by taking a closer look at Joseph Campbell and the Power of Myth. Each episode is made available below, with Dutch subtitles (thanks to an anonymous translator). At the same time this article will highlight the main parallells next to some striking differences between Joseph Campbell’s analysis of myth and the analysis of René Girard.

Episode 1: The Hero’s Adventure (first broadcast June 21, 1988 on PBS)

Joseph Campbell mainly considers myths as “metaphors for the experience of life”.  Myths symbolically describe fundamental experiences everyone has to deal with, especially the so-called “hero myths”. They recount “the hero’s journey”, which is a universal pattern visible in a myriad of situations.

Hero myths are expressions of external (physical) and/or internal (psychological) struggles. They represent a transition in one’s identity. Faced with new challenges, the hero leaves home to undergo a series of ordeals, in the process sacrificing his old identity. As the hero learns some lessons from the ordeals, he gradually adopts a new identity until he finally returns home with his treasure (of new experiences) and the ability to renew his world order. Thus hero myths can also be considered as “death and resurrection” stories. In these myths self-sacrifice is a morally justified necessity to achieve a new, more fulfilling life.

One example of a hero’s journey in life is being a student. Students are exempt from regular society life. They are granted time and space to undergo a series of tests while entering their respective fields of inquiry (unknown worlds to them, at first). As they go along, students achieve certain skills and knowledge until they finally adopt a new, more mature identity. This allows them to take up some kind of responsibility in their society. In other words, the student dies to his adolescent self and, returning to society, resurrects as a more fully equipped adult.

All of the above in the words of the man himself:

JOSEPH CAMPBELL: There is a certain typical hero sequence of actions, which can be detected in stories from all over the world, and from many, many periods of history. And I think it’s essentially, you might say, the one deed done by many, many different people.

There are two types of deed. One is the physical deed; the hero who has performed a war act or a physical act of heroism. Saving a life, that’s a hero act. Giving himself, sacrificing himself to another. And the other kind is the spiritual hero, who has learned or found a mode of experiencing the supernormal range of human spiritual life, and has then come back and communicated it. It’s a cycle. It’s a going and a return that the hero cycle represents.

This can be seen also in the simple initiation ritual, where a child has to give up his childhood and become an adult, has to die, you might say, to his infantile personality and psyche and come back as a self-responsible adult. It’s a fundamental experience that everyone has to undergo. We’re in our childhood for at least 14 years, and to get out of that posture of dependency, psychological dependency, into one of psychological self-responsibility, requires a death and resurrection. And that is the basic motif of the hero journey, leaving one condition, finding the source of life to bring you forth in a richer or more mature or other condition.

Otto Rank, in his wonderful, very short book called The Myth of the Birth of the Hero, says that everyone is a hero in his birth. He has undergone a tremendous transformation from a little, you might say, water creature. Living in a realm of the amniotic fluid and so forth, then coming out, becoming an air-breathing mammal that ultimately will be self-standing and so forth, is an enormous transformation and it is a heroic act. And it’s a heroic act on the mother’s part to bring it about. It’s the primary hero form, you might say.

Heroes and their myths function as models for our own way of life. They inspire us to imitate their behavior and deeds. Joseph Campbell, when asked about the potential of movies to provide new hero myths, opens up about some of his own role models:

JOSEPH CAMPBELL: I had a hero figure who meant something to me, and he served as a kind of model for myself in my physical character, and that was Douglas Fairbanks. I wanted to be a synthesis of Douglas Fairbanks and Leonardo da Vinci, that was my idea. But those were models, were roles, that came to me.

Campbell seems to acknowledge the importance of role models and mimesis, but he also insists on the hero being a true outsider, a maverick, someone who goes against the grain (important observations, especially relevant to René Girard’s mimetic theory – see below). Not surprisingly, Campbell considers the hero myth mainly to be a metaphor for an inner, psychological struggle that liberates us from a life in service of an often alienating social system. A contradiction seems to arise when he also considers initiation rituals as typical examples of the hero’s journey (see above). Indeed, through initiation rituals adolescents learn to acquire an identity that will sustain the social order of their community, sacrificing whatever inner or outer obstacle in the process.

At some point in the conversation with Bill Moyers, Campbell compares the hero Siegfried (a figure from Norse and German mythology) to the villain Darth Vader (a figure from the Star Wars mythology). What Campbell apparently fails to notice, is the unchanged sacrificial nature of both stories. Although Siegfried is used, in contrast to Darth Vader, as an example of someone who refuses to submit himself to a human world in the service of a technocratic system, he does submit himself to the powers of nature (the natural system or order).

JOSEPH CAMPBELL: The first stage in the hero adventure, when he starts off on the adventure, is leaving the realm of light, which he controls and knows about, and moving toward the threshold. And it’s at the threshold that the monster of the abyss comes to meet him. And then there are two or three results: one, the hero is cut to pieces and descends into the abyss in fragments, to be resurrected; or he may kill the dragon power, as Siegfried does when he kills the dragon. But then he tastes the dragon blood, that is to say, he has to assimilate that power. And when Siegfried has killed the dragon and tasted the blood, he hears the song of nature; he has transcended his humanity, you know, and reassociated himself with the powers of nature, which are the powers of our life, from which our mind removes us.

You see, this thing up here, this consciousness, thinks it’s running the shop. It’s a secondary organ; it’s a secondary organ of a total human being, and it must not put itself in control. It must submit and serve the humanity of the body.

When it does put itself in control, you get this [Darth] Vader, the man who’s gone over to the intellectual side.

[Darth Vader] isn’t thinking or living in terms of humanity, he’s living in terms of a system. And this is the threat to our lives; we all face it, we all operate in our society in relation to a system. Now, is the system going to eat you up and relieve you of your humanity, or are you going to be able to use the system to human purposes?

Siegfried sacrifices whatever gets in the way of acquiring a new, higher identity in correspondence with the forces of nature, while Darth Vader sacrifices whatever gets in the way of acquiring a new, higher identity in correspondence with the forces of technology. Campbell prefers one order or system over the other. From René Girard’s viewpoint, however, both systems (and the heroes who sustain them) are essentially the same. They imitate each other’s behavior and thereby resemble each other more and more. Both Siegfried’s and Darth Vader’s identity exist at the expense of sacrifice. Siegfried is the representative of a cultural identity that places technology in the service of nature, whereas Darth Vader is the representative of a cultural identity that places nature in the service of technology. In the real world, the advocates of those cultural identities rival each other, imitating each other’s sacrificial behavior: they become mimetic doubles.

Moreover, both Siegfried and Darth Vader are loners or “chosen ones” who are willing to perform sacrifices or sacrifice themselves to establish a certain order. As such, they paradoxically become cultural role models whose acts of (self-)sacrifice will be imitated and repeated in order to preserve, renew or save the social order that lives by their respective stories. In the words of the conversation between Moyers and Campbell:

BILL MOYERS: Unlike the classical heroes, we’re not going on our journey to save the world, but to save ourselves.

JOSEPH CAMPBELL: And in doing that, you save the world. I mean, you do. The influence of a vital person vitalizes, there’s no doubt about it. The world is a wasteland. People have the notion of saving the world by shifting it around and changing the rules and so forth. No, any world is a living world if it’s alive, and the thing is to bring it to life. And the way to bring it to life is to find in your own case where your life is, and be alive yourself, it seems to me.

According to Joseph Campbell, if you save yourself you save the world. In other words, we are part of a bigger whole and we should acknowledge and accept that. Moreover, eventually it’s the whole that counts. Campbell is very holistic and nature-oriented in his thoughts, even to the point where nature becomes something sacred, permeated by a larger consciousness. Again, from the conversation between Moyers and Campbell:

JOSEPH CAMPBELL: Jean and I are living in Hawaii, and we’re living right by the ocean. And we have a little lanai, a little porch, and there’s a coconut tree that grows up through the porch and it goes on up. And there’s a kind of vine, plant, big powerful thing with leaves like this, that has grown up the coconut tree. Now, that plant sends forth little feelers to go out and clutch the plant, and it knows where the plant is and what to do– where the tree is, and it grows up like this, and it opens a leaf, and that leaf immediately turns to where the sun is. Now, you can’t tell me that leaf doesn’t know where the sun is going to be. All of the leaves go just like that, what’s called heliotropism, turning toward where the sun is. That’s a form of consciousness. There is a plant consciousness, there is an animal consciousness. We share all of these things. You eat certain foods, and the bile knows whether there’s something there for it to go to work on. I mean, the whole thing is consciousness. I begin to feel more and more that the whole world is conscious; certainly the vegetable world is conscious, and when you live in the woods, as I did as a kid, you can see all these different consciousnesses relating to themselves.

BILL MOYERS: Scientists are beginning to talk quite openly about the Gaia principle.

JOSEPH CAMPBELL: There you are, the whole planet as an organism.

BILL MOYERS: Mother Earth.

JOSEPH CAMPBELL: And you see, if you will think of ourselves as coming out of the earth, rather than as being thrown in here from somewhere else, you know, thrown out of the earth, we are the earth, we are the consciousness of the earth. These are the eyes of the earth, and this is the voice of the earth. What else?

 

Episode 2: The Message of the Myth (first broadcast June 22, 1988 on PBS)

[TO BE CONTINUED]

Episode 3: The First Storytellers (first broadcast June 23, 1988 on PBS)

[TO BE CONTINUED]

Episode 4: Sacrifice and Bliss (first broadcast June 24, 1988 on PBS)

[TO BE CONTINUED]

Episode 5: Love and the Goddess (first broadcast June 25, 1988 on PBS)

[TO BE CONTINUED]

Episode 6: Masks of Eternity (first broadcast June 26, 1988 on PBS)

[TO BE CONTINUED]